Blog

6 reasons to consider print advertising

Tried and tested, eye-catching, lovely to look at, we think print is brilliant! Here are our top 6 reasons for loving print…

1. It reaches all demographics. Not everyone is online (we know, it’s shocking!) But with print promotion, it’s possible to track down and reach any group of people you can think of, no matter how niche your target audience

2. It can be tied into your other marketing activities. Printed materials can work beautifully as the heart of an integrated marketing campaign, directing people to your online activities, offers, or competitions.

3. It’s immediate. There’s no distance or delay with print, and you can make sure it reaches people when they’re at their most receptive.

4. It’s credible. Want to add clout and credibility to a campaign? A beautifully designed brochure is the way to go!

5. It’s hard to ignore. Brochures or leaflets don’t have a delete button! They’re physical, tangible and unavoidable and it’s notoriously hard to resist the urge to flick through a brochure or What’s On guide! Studies suggest that around 80% of printed mail is opened compared to just 20% of emails.*

6. It works. Ultimately, there’s nothing more convincing than seeing results! Here’s what our clients have to say about print distribution campaigns we’ve helped them run…

“Around 40% of visitors surveyed had picked up a Jerwood Gallery leaflet and we’ve also seen an improvement in visitors from London.” – Jerwood Gallery

“The campaign was a great success and this was measured by seeing the amount of visitors who came to the gallery as opposed to the same time last year. This was up 70%.” – Watts Gallery

So if you’re not already producing printed marketing materials… why not?

 


 

 

Arts and Culture Marketing Round-Up

Here at London Calling we work with some fantastic theatres, art galleries, dance studios, museums and cultural venues. We spend our time promoting great cultural events and activities, so we know the obstacles our clients face and just how difficult arts marketing can be!

Luckily the internet is full of useful advice about how to engage arts audiences…

Today we’re rounding up the best advice, news, tips and ‘how to’s to give you a helping hand with your upcoming marketing campaigns:

5 innovative Event Marketing Ideas to Learn from
Featuring operas, theatres and music festivals, this list gives 5 great examples of unique and innovative marketing campaigns for events.
Read it here

Design and Print – An Introduction for Arts and Cultural Marketers
A fantastic overview for designing top-notch printed promo materials to advertise your organisation, venue and events.
Read it here

How to Sell your Show at a Fringe Festival
From chasing reviews to writing press releases to flyering, here’s how to sell tickets if you’re putting on a show at a fringe festival.
Read it here

7 Social Media Marketing Tips for Art Galleries
Those clever folks at Mashable really know their stuff when it comes to digital marketing. Here they turn their attention to social media for art venues and galleries.
Read it here

100 Inspiring Ideas to Market your Business
A fantastic check-list of key marketing activities that any organisation can learn from.
Read it here

How to Promote your Event through Twitter Competitions
Twitter can be the perfect channel for promoting an event. Here’s a great introduction to using social to market your event.
Read it here

 

 

 

 

Now recruiting: Digital Officer at Culture Calling

** This position has now been filled **

 

Culture Calling Digital Officer

Full-Time/37.5 hours a week although Part-Time option will be considered

Reporting to: Sales & Operations Director, Culture Calling

Department: Digital

 

Culture Calling and London Calling Arts have built their reputation displaying print and targeting audiences across the Arts, Leisure and Tourist industries bringing new visitors to their favourite arts and cultural institutions.

The role: The role of Culture Calling Digital Officer is a key position within the digital department of London Calling, contributing substantially to the success of the company and its digital range of marketing and consumer services.

The Culture Calling Digital Officer manages the online presence for Culture Calling, primarily through B2C channels but also B2B. We are looking for someone who has the expertise and passion for social media, including knowledge of social media platforms, social media metrics, email marketing, website content management, SEO and Google Analytics.

The marketing of Culture Calling as a brand and our services is also a vital component of this role and this will involve working closely with the sales team to develop new strategy and offers.

 

Key Duties and Responsibilities  

  • Create content ideas for Culture Calling’s online channels – planning, writing and executing content
  • Contribute to and implement the ever changing social media strategy for the Company
  • Community management – engage with existing communities and come up with ideas for growing and expanding Culture Calling’s presence online
  • Manage all social media budgets for advertising and campaigns
  • Build email campaigns for the B2B market and B2C market
  • Undertake integrated marketing campaigns alongside the Client Services Account Management and Sales Team for Culture Calling and our clients
  • Building relationships and contacts within PR agencies and PR/Marketing departments in arts and culture organisations
  • Working alongside company interns assisting with website content and feature writing
  • To keep abreast of developments in arts marketing and the cultural sector
  • Represent the company at various events whilst maintaining goodwill for the company’s services
  • To adhere to Culture Calling’s values in all areas of the role and in all dealings with clients, suppliers and colleagues
  • To undertake any other such duties as may be deemed appropriate to the role of Culture Calling Digital Officer
  • To assist the members of the Senior Management Team with tasks as required
  • To assist the London Calling Online Brand Manager with tasks as required including developing and maintaining the LondonCalling.com B2C website

 

Essential

  • Substantial experience of managing social media communications for an organisation or brand
  • Experience of using and managing a content management system
  • Excellent writing and editing skills, with an understanding of digital content creation including keywords and SEO
  • Fluent in both spoken and written English
  • Thorough and meticulous with an eye for detail
  • PhotoShop, InDesign, Flash and Final Cut experience
  • Impeccable copy writing skills
  • A creative self-starter, able to work independently as well as part of a team
  • Passionate about all things art, theatre and culture
  • A willingness to work beyond the normal ‘9-5’ in looking after Culture Calling’s online presence

 

Desirable

  • Experience of filming and editing simple videos for online social media
  • Knowledge of HTML for web and email (including testing across multiple email clients)
  • Strong understanding of keyword plans and on page optimization

Interested in joining the dynamic team behind London Calling Arts and Culture Calling? Send your CV with a cover letter to helen@londoncalling.com.

 

 

 

Our team of arts experts

I came to London Calling from a dance background; a dance graduate straight from an internship at a dance festival with pretty much all my free time dedicated to dancing. It’s safe to say that dance is where my love lies within the arts! Coming to work at London Calling affirmed the enjoyment of dance I’ve always had. But more importantly it opened my eyes to a world of cultural happenings that I had not previously known about. And that’s what London Calling aims to do: spread the word about the greatest, most prestigious and sometimes wackiest cultural events that London has to offer.

A couple of weeks ago my colleague Becca booked herself a bed for an hour before work to have a comfy brekkie in the heart of Shoreditch at the Ikea Breakfast in Bed Cafe. That evening, I was at the Udderbelly on the Southbank watching a spectacular juggling show. The following day I went to the Sky Garden to watch a live gig.

I don’t think a paragraph could better sum up the diversity of our jobs and of London itself!

The great thing about the London Calling team is that our passions lie in different aspects of the arts and most of us have come from an arts background – that makes us even more enthusiastic about the clients we work with. There is always someone in the office on hand to give their expertise on the newest fringe theatre show or who has been to the latest exhibition at the V & A. It makes our weekdays particularly exciting as there’s always something happening that someone is keen to dash off to after work.

The London Calling office is a great place to work as the topic of conversation always revolves around the latest musical that has opened or a must-see exhibition. As a team we have so much passion for the arts, promoting them comes to us as second nature. As with all things you care about, you want everyone else to be passionate about it too! Our love of the arts enables us to advise our clients expertly and help make sure as many people as possible are aware of their venue or event.

There are plenty of perks of being a part of the London Calling team. We get to go off and meet our lovely clients in stunning venues which take us across the city on a daily basis – my Monday this week consisted of visiting Somerset House and the Estorick Collection all before lunch time.  There is always a new pop up or festival happening somewhere in the city, and we always enjoy using our knowledge from visiting these wonderful locations to target audiences for our clients.

All of these experiences, both visiting clients and exploring London’s cultural jungle on our own time add to the knowledge that we can provide our clients. We are lucky that we find out about all these things as they reach fruition and we love nothing more than spreading the word about clients’ events to our ever-growing following of culturally aware readers through print, editorial and social media offerings.

The vast variety of clients we all work with feeds our interest in the arts and in turn we can feed this into giving great advice on campaigns in order to share the best of London with the people living and working in (I may be biased) the most diverse, cultural, artistic and greatest city in the world.

By Alice Westoby, Junior Account Handler

What do the next 5 years hold for the arts & cultural industries?

Funding for the creative industries is consistently under threat. With cut backs in other vital areas of society (see NHS), and a nationwide housing crisis, it’s understandable that for many the arts are considered to be a ‘luxury item’. However, the arts are a vital part of societal structure. The expression of key creative minds is what, amongst other things, defines an era and a generation. Art is a necessary platform for questioning, and bringing about change through experimentation.

Regardless of the outcome of the recent general election, the question of where we go now is and was always looming. Now is the perfect time to question: what will the arts and cultural industries look like in the next five years? When faced with potential adversity, out come the individuals and organisations that will strive for the continuation of cultural industry. The arts are nothing if not adaptable.

On the 8th of May, the day of the election announcement, Marcus Romer, Artistic Director of Pilot Theatre, put out a rallying call on Twitter to fellow arts leaders. The message was simple: ‘make a piece of work that starts the fight back’. Since then, the hashtag #artsfightback has been established, and over 300 practitioners have stepped forward to support Romer’s pledge.

Social media serves as a free and accessible way to effectively link the widespread creative community, enabling those people with a shared objective to start up conversations and offer support no matter the distance.

Similarly, online platforms like Kickstarter and Crowdfunder provide an alternative method to garner funding, and play well with social media. They enable the creator to promote a creative initiative to the general public and gain donations, often in exchange for a small piece of the pie to the generous donor. A quick glance at the Crowdfunder arts section reveals projects ranging from a new ceramics studio, sending a show to Edinburgh Fringe, and putting on a Japanese art exhibition. Since it’s launch in 2009, Kickstarter has reportedly received more than $1.5 billion in pledges from 7.8 million backers to fund 200,000 creative projects.

Gaining support from individual donors frees the creative organisation from the red tape that typically comes with being funded by a governmental body. But what message does this send to the government? Certainly, that the general public are largely in support of the arts. Potentially, that there is even more of an excuse to lessen the amount of public money allocated to the arts.

The good news: many UK and Globally active corporations are philanthropically backing the arts and cultural sectors. In a recent press release by the National Portrait Gallery, Andrea Sullivan, Head of Corporate Social Responsibility, EMEA, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, said: ‘we believe that maintaining a vibrant arts sector is crucial to ensuring strong communities and economies.’ This statement was presented regarding a long-standing partnership of support that the Bank of America has provided to the NPG and other such organizations. In the coming years, larger organizations will play a big role in ensuring the availability of the arts to all.

As mentioned by Andrea Sullivan, and called upon by Marcus Romer, community is at the heart of the arts. The perfect example would be Ealing Borough Council who created the Ealing Summer Festivals as a way to celebrate the borough’s strong music and comedy history. The festival draws huge crowds to Ealing’s parks in celebration of local and international acts across a range of artistic disciplines. Such an event will also surely bring outsiders into the borough, providing an influx of revenue to local businesses. It is in this way that the arts are also shown to be a vital and economically viable resource.

London Calling has been working with businesses in the arts, cultural and leisure sectors for over 30 years, through various changes in government. We pride ourselves on providing high quality products, which enable companies large and small to thrive in whatever economy they are faced with. The future of the arts & cultural industries may be pending at present, but one things for sure, we’re not going anywhere.

by Marina Nenadic, Sales and New Business Manager

A Day in the Life at London Calling

Tom Butler Partnerships Manager and Editor

The other evening, my considerably better half asked me what I’d been up to at work that day. At the time, I was conjuring up a banquet in the kitchen that Mr Roux Sr and his lad would be proud of. Glad of the excuse to break away from creating my beef wellington masterpiece, the conversation went as follows…

Me: I was working on the distribution for a new musical coming to the West End first thing. After that it was on to a digital and social media campaign for a music festival in town. Then it was on to an ambient campaign for an exhibition opening at a gallery before looking at direct marketing options for a charity campaign.

Better Half: Pretty busy day then?

Me: That was just in the morning! In the afternoon I arranged several interviews for the website, organised an exclusive event for our readers next week and agreed a deal to host music videos on the homepage.

Better Half: Wow, how did you fit all that in, you’re amazing!

Now I should probably come clean and admit that my girlfriend did not say I was amazing she merely looked utterly indifferent and put The Real Housewives of Somewhere Nice on. Also please note that for an accurate portrayal of the evening’s meal please substitute beef wellington for chicken and noodles!

However, the sheer variety and diversity of campaigns that I’d worked on that day is spot on, and it’s one of the main reasons why I enjoy my job so much. The idea of a typical day at work simply doesn’t exist at LC! Many times I’ve made a ‘to do list’ at the start of the day, only for that to be thrown out the window five minutes later.

That ability to be flexible, working on creative solutions that we can implement that afternoon if required, is something we’re rightly proud of here and as the ticket buying public become ever more savvy to last minute special offers we need to be ever more adaptable to our client’s needs.

The launch of LondonCalling.com back in July 2011, of which I am the Editor, certainly added another string to our bow and now a good proportion of my week is taken up with securing great features, competitions and content for our site and social media channels. It’s also yet another example of how varied and interesting a day here can be.

Last week I received pitches from some of my freelancers covering topics such as So Solid Crew, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel 2, the upcoming Noel Fielding exhibition, comedians at Soho Theatre, singers at Ronnie Scotts a display of artwork by a noted Azerbaijanian artist and a vast array of events taking place if you weren’t keen on spending fortunes on Valentine’s Day (check out the site if you want to see which ones made the cut!).

So if you’re one of our wonderful clients who was wondering what a typical day in the office is like, there isn’t one! Perhaps not the ideal answer for a Day In The Life Of piece, but an accurate one nonetheless!

Now if you’ll excuse me, my ‘to do list’ still hasn’t been touched today and I’ve got to get home to whip up another culinary storm later on. For culinary storm please read omelette/stir fry/anything I can find in the fridge!